What God Has Joined Together

e5ccb4eddc8ce56e770337977bff6a84 copy Last week I wrote a piece on the reflection of Christ and the Church on dating relationships. To my surprise within 24 hours it was one of the most viewed posts in Sayable's history. It seems the Church—and not just singles—is desperate for clear reminders of what marriage is at its core.

The more I thought about the core of marriage, especially in light of the recent legislative decisions, the more my heart began to break for my friends and family who are desperate to enter into marriage with their same-sex partners. I love these people and it pierces my heart when I hear them say earnestly, "Why would you want to legislate who I can love?"

Now, first things first, I am not interested in legislating love. I am, however, in favor of a more holistic and Christ/Gospel-centric love. I want to see past the "Do unto others..." surface love, and delve into the root of love, namely God's love and all its implications.

Our love will always be dim until we behold Him face to face—and there is no chance of that on this side of the Kingdom. So yes, love who you will, but let us check ourselves for the quality of the love we experience.

Love, however, is a tricky emotion, so qualifying it is nearly impossible for any one of us, straight or gay. If I were in love, how could I explain how bright the stars look when he is around? or how brilliant the colors are? or how my heart jumps into my throat? I cannot. Goodness gracious, gladly I cannot.

So there must be something deeper than our definition of love on the table here, but what is it?

Throughout all of scripture God deals with His chosen people as a bride awaiting her bridegroom. Woven through the entire Old Testament and carried to near fullness in the New, God endears Himself to His people in various ways.

He helps her to see her helplessness without Him. He helps her to see her beauty in His eyes. He woos her when she plays the harlot. He comes to earth in the form of a man, a Groom, and lays His life down for her, the ultimate sacrifice. He promises to come soon to take her home with Him.

God, in beautiful ways, makes it clear to His people that He and they are wholly different from one another. Though man was created in God's image—a likeness in part, a reflection—intrinsically they are not the same. This is not a simple love story, though, here is the most sacrificial love possible: this is two entities, completely distinct, absolutely different, and intrinsically separate—brought together to form an eternal union.

A homosexual union cannot be, by its nature, a reflection of Christ and the Church because Christ and the Church are intrinsically and holistically different from one another. For the Christian, the bride of Christ, a homosexual marriage cannot reflect that which marriage is intended to display: their union with Christ.

It is not about biology or parts fitting together, or feelings of love, or a fullness of emotion, or unalterable attraction—it is the definition of a love story, legislated by God, for the good of all men. It is the greatest love ever known. Earthly marriage between a man and woman is meant to be a profound mystery, but it is meant to be a mere illustration of what happens when two holistically different entities are joined together.

The kingdom is made complete.